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July 2014 comics sales estimates online; multiple Diamond-era records beaten

Monday, August 11, 2014

by John Jackson Miller
http://www.mycomicshop.com/search?q=rocket+raccoon+1&pubid=&PubRng=?AffID=874007P01The comics industry in North America moved into positive territory for 2014 with a record-setting month of July, according to Comichron's analysis of data released by Diamond Comic Distributors. Click to see the sales estimates for comics ordered in July 2014.

A much larger number of new comic book and graphic novel releases for the month helped July's sales to set a number of records for the Diamond Exclusive Era, which began in April 1997:

Highest dollar value for orders of the Top 300 comics: $30.62 million. This beat out the record set in September 2013.

Highest combined dollar value for orders of the Top 300 comics and Top 300 Graphic Novels: $39.27 milllion. This also beat out a record set in September 2013.

Highest dollar value for all comics, trade paperbacks, and magazines: $53.63 million. This clobbered the previous record, set in October 2013, by more than $3 million.

Highest sales for the 300th-place comic book in a five-week month: 6,620 copies. This also beat the record set in October 2013.

Highest average price of comics offered in the Top 300: $3.79. This beat the previous record high by seven cents.

And we don't keep detailed records on this, but it really is remarkable how many new comic releases are coming from the middle-tier publishers. Image had 66 new comics this month, IDW 48, Dynamite 40, Dark Horse 39, Boom 29; it all contributed to a month where the 300th place book this July would have ranked 250th just five years ago and 192nd 10 years ago. The middle-to-lower tier titles are simply stronger relative to times past, and there are more of them.

And Titan Entertainment broke into the Top 100 this month now that it's offering the Doctor Who comics, with titles in 59th and 67th places. So there are more players vying for the top spots, too.

The aggregate change statistics:

TOP 300 COMICS UNIT SALES
July 2014: 8.09 million copies
Versus 1 year ago this month: +11%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +17%
Versus 10 years ago this month: +32%
Versus 15 years ago this month: +21%
YEAR TO DATE: 46.48 million copies, -5% vs. 2013, +10% vs. 2009, +10% vs. 2004, +4 vs. 1999
ALL COMICS UNIT SALES
July 2014 versus one year ago this month: +14.73%
YEAR TO DATE: -3.16%

TOP 300 COMICS DOLLAR SALES
July 2014: $30.62 million
Versus 1 year ago this month: +14%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +27%
Versus 10 years ago this month: +72%
Versus 15 years ago this month: +79%
YEAR TO DATE: $175.39 million, -1% vs. 2013, +21% vs. 2009, +45% vs. 2004, +54% vs. 1999
ALL COMICS DOLLAR SALES
July 2014 versus one year ago this month: +19.23%
YEAR TO DATE: +1.76%

TOP 300 TRADE PAPERBACK DOLLAR SALES
July 2014: $8.64 million
Versus 1 year ago this month: +9%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +18%
Versus 10 years ago this month, just the Top 100 vs. the Top 100: +56%
Versus 15 years ago this month, just the Top 25 vs. the Top 25: +61%
YEAR TO DATE: $51.04 million, -6% vs. 2013
ALL TRADE PAPERBACK  SALES
July 2014 versus one year ago this month: +4.84%
YEAR TO DATE: +3.25%
 
TOP 300 COMICS + TOP 300 TRADE PAPERBACK DOLLAR SALES
July 2014: $39.27 million
Versus 1 year ago this month: +14%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +14%
Versus 10 years ago this month, counting just the Top 100 TPBs: +53%
Versus 15 years ago this month, counting just the Top 25 TPBs: +91%
YEAR TO DATE: $156.5 million, -5% vs. 2013
ALL COMICS AND TRADE PAPERBACK  SALES
July 2014 versus one year ago this month: +14.52%
YEAR TO DATE: +2.22%

OVERALL DIAMOND SALES (including all comics, trades, and magazines)
July 2014: approximately $53.63 million (subject to revision)
Versus 1 year ago this month: +15%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +29%
Versus 10 years ago this month: +92%
YEAR TO DATE: $207.85 million, unchanged vs. 2013

RELEASES
New comic books released: 530
New graphic novels released: 312
New magazines released: 49
All new releases: 891

The average comic book in the Top 300 cost $3.79, and the average comic book ordered did, too. The average comic book in the Top 25 also cost $3.79, possibly the first time all three of those figures have been equal. The median and most common price for comics offered was $3.99. Click to see comics prices across time.

Rocket Raccoon #1 was the lead title on the comics list, and as discussed here on Friday, its reported sales of nearly 294,000 copies was boosted by at least 100,000 copies because of a sale to a single account, the subscription club Loot Crate. (Read more about the firm and its purchase here and here.) The company bought the comics non-returnably just as any other Direct Market account; in essence, it is somewhat like one of the other new-comics-by-mail services whose sales already are accounted for by Diamond's charts — with a significant exception: since the service only bought the one issue, the second issue's sales will reflect only the comics shops' sales.

Regardless, even if the Loot Crate contribution is half the title's orders, it would only account for a little over 1% of the market's sales this month.

http://www.mycomicshop.com/search?q=life+with+archie+36&pubid=&PubRng=?AffID=874007P01
Life with Archie #36 hit the charts at 27th place with orders of more than 57,000 copies — as did the magazine-format version of the issue, which made it into 297th place with orders of more than 6,000 copies. While Diamond keeps a separate tally for magazines, the magazine format Life with Archie was been appearing in Diamond's comics section all along, so there's no change there.
 
Batman Eternal no longer has the returnable asterisk in July's report; reported sales on the title increased, perhaps partially as a reflection of the sales no longer being reduced for returnability.

A few notes about some changes to the charts as they come from Diamond. First, once again, only the Top 300 was released to the media; I have confirmed with Diamond that the several months during the past year in which the Top 400 were released was an error, and not a change in policy. Diamond has released just the Top 300 for nearly 20 years, and that will continue to be the policy -- with the addition of a few items outside 300th place that appear in the Top 50 Small Publisher lists each month.

There is a case to be made for going out to 400th place when so many titles are coming out; only 14 publishers appeared in the Top 300 this month, just one more than the record low. My projections are that the Top 300 now captures 92% of all comics Diamond sells, while the Top 400 captures 97%, so it is a bit more than a marginal addition. But clearly the Top 300 still does capture the vast majority of comics sales (and far more than the Top 300 graphic novel list does). Comichron will continue to print any items after 300th place that Diamond sends, but will just the Top 300s for cross-time comparisons no matter what is released.

Next, for several years readers have asked why Comichron has listed Dynamite titles as coming from Dynamic Forces. Dynamite is an imprint of Dynamic Forces, which has had a presence in the charts for more than a decade; when the Dynamite line was started, Diamond continued to refer to the company as Dynamic Forces in its market share reports and counted the sales of Dynamite as belonging to Dynamic Forces, just as Vertigo's share belongs to DC. Comichron likewise ignores imprint distinctions in its listings, so we continued to use "Dynamic Forces."

In recent times, however -- perhaps because the Dynamite line now represents most of Dynamic Forces' product moving through Diamond -- Diamond has gone back and forth between calling the publisher Dynamic Forces and Dynamite Entertainment in its market share listings in its spreadsheets released to the press. (It was listed as Dynamic Forces in the file as recently as June.) But whatever the name might be in the internal record-keeping (and I imagine that it's all still one account under the original name), Diamond has regularly been changing the name to Dynamite in tables in its press releases accompanying the sales charts. So we're doing it as well, starting with July. Offerings under the Dynamic Forces label rarely make the Top 300 in these days of so many new comics releases, so it makes sense to do it at this point.

But we will probably not make the change retroactive, as there's a lot to update -- and again, further back we get into a time when it's more Dynamic Forces-labeled material than Dynamite making the charts.

John Jackson Miller has tracked the comics industry for more than 20 years, including a decade editing the industry's retail trade magazine; he is the author of several guides to comics, as well as more than a hundred comic books for various franchises. He is the author of the New York Times bestseller Star Wars: Kenobi and the upcoming hardcover Star Wars: A New Dawn. Visit his fiction site at http://www.farawaypress.com. And be sure to follow Comichron on Twitter and Facebook!

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July 2014 comics market tops $53 million, most in Diamond Exclusive Era; Rocket Raccoon, Walking Dead lead lists

Friday, August 8, 2014


by John Jackson Miller

July in recent years has tended to be a month where things really get going for comics; sales did indeed, reaching their highest dollar value in the Diamond Exclusive Era which began in 1997. Comics shops in North America ordered more than $53.6 million in comics, graphic novels, and magazines, topping $50 million for the second time and besting October's previous Diamond-Era record of $50.3 million.

It was a five-week month against a five-week month, so that factor is not in play; what it was was a month in which a lot of new comics shipped. Diamond Comic Distributors shipped 530 new comic books in July, which is the highest figure seen since Diamond began releasing those statistics one year ago. The release of 312 graphic novels was also the highest seen in a year — and when one of those books is Walking Dead Vol. 21, it's likely to be a decent July. The result was a month with the largest year-over-year change since last September: comics and graphic novel sales were up 14.52% over a year ago. The seven-month total has now topped $300 million, and is ahead 2.22% year-to-year.

The aggregate sales changes:

JULY 2014 VS. JUNE 2014 DOLLAR CHANGE UNIT CHANGE
COMICS 32.22% 29.25%
GRAPHIC NOVELS 21.04% 24.64%
TOTAL COMICS/GN 28.66% 28.88%
JULY 2014 VS. JULY 2013
COMICS 19.23% 14.73%
GRAPHIC NOVELS 4.84% 4.59%
TOTAL COMICS/GN 14.52% 13.87%
YEAR-TO-DATE 2014 VS. YEAR-TO-DATE 2013
COMICS 1.76% -3.16%
GRAPHIC NOVELS 3.25% 5.27%
TOTAL COMICS/GN 2.22% -2.51%

As has been reported elsewhere, a ginormous purchase of copies of Rocket Raccoon #1 was made by Loot Crate, a reseller that repacks pop cultural items to sell to subscribers. Loot Crate has a Diamond account and buys non-returnably like the other retailers — and so, like non-Direct Market sellers like Hastings, its figures are reflected in the numbers. The Guardians of the Galaxy tie-in was the #1 comic book for the month.

The top-sellers:

TOP COMIC BOOKS PRICE VENDOR
1 ROCKET RACCOON #1 $3.99 Marvel
2 BATMAN #33 $4.99 DC
3 AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #4 $3.99 Marvel
4 ORIGINAL SIN #5 $3.99 Marvel
5 SPIDER-MAN 2099 #1 $3.99 Marvel
6 ORIGINAL SIN #6 $3.99 Marvel
7 JUSTICE LEAGUE #32 $3.99 DC
8 GRAYSON #1 $2.99 DC
9 THE LEGENDARY STAR-LORD #1 $3.99 Marvel
10 HARLEY QUINN #8 $2.99 DC
TOP GRAPHIC NOVELS and TRADE PAPERBACKS PRICE VENDOR
1 THE WALKING DEAD VOL. 21: ALL-OUT WAR PART 2 $14.99 Image
2 AVATAR: THE LAST AIRBENDER VOL. 8: RIFT PART 2 $10.99 Dark Horse
3 DEADLY CLASS VOLUME 1: REAGAN YOUTH $9.99 Image
4 SAGA VOLUME 1 $9.99 Image
5 BRYAN LEE O'MALLEY: SECONDS GN $25.00 Random House
6 DEADPOOL VOLUME 5: THE WEDDING OF DEADPOOL $15.99 Marvel
7 SAGA VOLUME 3 $14.99 Image
8 STAR WARS: THE LUCAS DRAFT $19.99 Dark Horse
9 BATMAN VOLUME 1: THE COURT OF OWLS $16.99 DC
10 LAZARUS VOLUME 2: LIFT $14.99 Image

The market shares, which include Archie above 2% thanks to the Life with Archie issue:

DOLLAR SHARE UNIT SHARE
Marvel 35.09% 38.39%
DC 28.18% 31.32%
Image 9.25% 9.82%
IDW 5.21% 4.11%
Dark Horse 5.02% 3.80%
Dynamic Forces/Dynamite 2.18% 2.16%
Archie 2.04% 1.88%
Boom 1.76% 1.78%
Eaglemoss 1.05% 0.24%
Zenescope 1.05% 0.87%
Other 9.18% 5.62%

And here's what Diamond shipped in the month:
 
Comics Shipped GNs Shipped Magazines Total Shipped
Marvel 93 36 0 129
DC 97 31 0 128
Image 66 17 0 83
IDW 48 31 0 79
Dark Horse 39 29 0 68
Dynamic Forces/Dynamite 40 4 0 44
Boom 29 4 0 33
Zenescope 14 4 0 18
Archie 15 5 0 20
Eaglemoss 0 0 10 10
Other 89 151 39 279
Total 530 312 49 891

More next week...

John Jackson Miller has tracked the comics industry for more than 20 years, including a decade editing the industry's retail trade magazine; he is the author of several guides to comics, as well as more than a hundred comic books for various franchises. He is the author of the New York Times bestseller Star Wars: Kenobi and the upcoming hardcover Star Wars: A New Dawn. Visit his fiction site at http://www.farawaypress.com. And be sure to follow Comichron on Twitter and Facebook!

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Comics and graphic novel market reaches $870 million in 2013

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

According to new estimate by Comichron and ICV2

The market for comics and graphic novels in the U.S. and Canada reached $870 million at retail last year, according to a new estimate prepared jointly by ICv2’s Milton Griepp and Comichron’s John Jackson Miller.

“I’ve been networking with Milton on questions of the numbers underlying the business since he was at Capital City Distribution and I was editing Comics Retailer magazine back in the 1990s,” Miller said.

“It’s been great to formally collaborate on these estimates for the first time, and I think the result is the most inclusive and accurate picture of the market either of us has ever been able to produce.”

“I’m very excited about the market model this collaboration with John has produced,” Griepp said.  “I’ve always had great respect for John’s work in the area of comic sales, and putting our heads together has enabled us to build a model that all can use to analyze and understand the market.”

As presented in the accompanying infographic, the 2013 analysis by ICv2 and Comichron was divided up between periodical comics (what some call “floppies” or “pamphlets”), graphic novels, and digital download-to-own sales. Graphic novels contributed the largest portion ($415 million) and comic books nearly as much ($365 million), and digital (based on numbers released yesterday by ICv2) continued to grow faster than the market at $90 million. All print figures are calculated based on the full retail price of books sold into the market, and do not account for discounting or markup.

According to the report by Comichron and ICv2, comics periodical sales occur primarily in the comics store channel ($340 million) and to a declining degree in the “newsstand” channel ($25 million).  For book format products, well over half of all graphic novel sales ($245 million) occur in the book channel, with a smaller share ($170 million) in the comics store channel.

ICv2 and Comichron also collaborated on market estimates for 2011 and 2012, revising earlier estimates by both.  According to the new report, comics periodical sales grew from $300 million in 2011 to $335 million in 2012; graphic novel sales grew from $390 million in 2011 to $400 million in 2012; and combined comics and graphic novel sales grew from $690 million in 2011 to $735 million in 2012.

“It’s great that the comics market has found new ways to grow even as the over-all book and magazine markets remain challenged,” Griepp said. “It’s proof of the fundamental entertainment and literary value of the comics medium.”

“According to our records here at Comichron, without adjusting for inflation, this is the highest dollar value the market has reached since 1993,” Miller said. “That’s great for the business, and we’re excited to see what comes next.”

Comichron is the world’s largest public repository of comic-book sales figures, featuring data from the 1930s to today about comic book and graphic novel circulation, cover prices, and market shares on its website, www.comichron.com. With data and analysis on the distant past as well as the present, Comichron serves as a trusted resource for academics studying the the historical reach of the medium and for collectors seeking accurate information about how many copies of a comic book originally circulated.

ICv2 is the #1 industry source on the business of geek culture, including comics and graphic novels, manga and anime, movie/TV products, and hobby games, on its Website, www.ICv2.com, and in its magazine, Internal Correspondence.  For the people on the front lines of the geek culture business, staying ahead of the trends isn't something that can be left to chance-it's a basic necessity for being successful.  That's why ICv2 is the #1 source of news and information for the buyers, gatekeepers, and tastemakers on the front lines.  ICv2 is where trend-watching is a science.

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The life of Archie: 54 years of circulation history

Monday, July 14, 2014

by John Jackson Miller

Archie Andrews has cheated the calendar for many years, having been a teenager since his comics debut in the 1940s, but death finds him — at least in an alternate reality—in the upcoming Life With Archie #36, according to CBR reports today.

"Wein's Law" — named for Len Wein, the writer who coined it — famously holds that "no one in comics is ever dead unless you can see the body, and usually not even then." Comics "deaths" are usually temporary in nature and often done as a publicity stunt, and they have often been greatly successful in gaining attention. The November 1992 "Death of Superman" resulted in a reported $30 million day in comics shops, the most money ever made in the business in a single day; and more recently, the death (also temporary) of Captain America led to the comic book where it happened becoming the best-selling issue of 2007.  

Life With Archie is a magazine-sized title set in a different universe from regular Archie continuity, so this event doesn't exactly fit the mold: the regular Archie title goes on — as does Afterlife With Archie, the title which in June gave Archie — and his eponymous publishing house — its first ever appearance at the top of the graphic novel bestseller list. (See the just-released June estimates here.) As noted in our reports of that event, the main Archie title itself was no stranger to the top of the comic book charts, once upon a time; after many years of collecting, I am pleased to present the complete circulation record of the main Archie title, as reported in statements filed with the United States Postal Service. Click to see the grid of circulation statements.

The main Archie title began in Winter 1942 and has been published without interruption ever since; its frequency has changed over the years, increasing or decreasing to reflect market situations, but it has never been renumbered. (That makes it the longest-running ongoing North American title never to be renumbered, a good honor to have.) It has been sold by second-class or periodical-class subscription for most of that time, and as such, has had to file Statements of Ownership, Management, and Circulation, which it prints in the comic book in the early part of each year. Where DC and, more recently, Marvel have stopped printing the forms, Archie continues to do so, and so Archie represents one of the few titles for which an unbroken track of reports from 1960 exist.


The cross-time picture they paint is a good deal different from what could be drawn for many other titles, in part because of the nature of the comic book and its audience. The main Archie title was very popular in the newsstand era. Archie had been running for 18 years when the 1960s began; the title was selling half a million copies at that point. The series reached its post-1960 peak in 1968 with the launch of the animated TV series from Filmation, which ran during the 1968-69 season on CBS; by 1969, when the song "Sugar, Sugar" released by a band called The Archies reached #1 on the Billboard pop charts, Archie, too, surpassed Superman and Batman to become the #1 title in comics.


It remained at #1 through 1973, based on Comichron's collection of circulation statements; finally, in 1974, The Amazing Spider-Man and Superman both passed it. During the distribution tumult of the 1970s, Archie began focusing more on digests — a market it had helped to create through its work with the Comics Magazine Association of America to establish grocery store counter dumps; as such, in 1977, the same year that Archie fell out of the top 10, its sales were surpassed by Archie Comics Digest. Betty and Veronica surpassed Archie's sales in 1980.

In 1982, the title's frequency was reduced from monthly to bimonthly. As the comic-shop market grew in the 1980s, Archie's publishing focus remained on the newsstand; sales recovered a little in the late 1980s thanks in part to added attention to its subscription business, but the flourishing of the comic book market helped Archie less than most publishers, given its younger target demographic. Enough so that when the early 1990s brought a colossal boom in the comics shop market, it's barely noticeable from the title's sales. Editorial initiatives in the 2000s sought to raise the title's sales, with particular success in 2007, and later with the release of the landmark 600th issue. By the 2010s, however, the monthly comic book was being outsold three-to-one by its digest counterpart.

So the major differences between the title and other comics make it less reflective than most books of the history of circulation in the intervening years; as noted, it's not even a great bellwether for the publisher itself, where digests, digital, and other formats are an ever-larger part of the business. (Archie sold well over 2 million digests last year, judging from the other postal statements.) [7/15 addition:] Further, the title is increasingly less tied to the flagging fortunes of the newsstand market: comics shops accounted for about four out of every nine copies that visited a cash register in 2013. The main title's sales in comics shops have increased during the last decade: this June's #656 had orders of 4,063 copies, versus 3,097 copies for #549, exactly ten years earlier. 

But all told, more than 85 million copies of the main Archie title were sold between 1960 and 2013, making it one of the comics you're most likely to find on the secondary market. Archie lives — in our reality, anyway!

Look here tomorrow for the release of the long-awaited 2013 end-of-year data, including the direct market, outside channels, and digital, the product of our first-ever joint analysis with ICV2.

John Jackson Miller has tracked the comics industry for more than 20 years, including a decade editing the industry's retail trade magazine; he is the author of several guides to comics, as well as more than a hundred comic books for various franchises. He is the author of the New York Times bestseller Star Wars: Kenobi and the upcoming hardcover Star Wars: A New Dawn. Visit his fiction site at http://www.farawaypress.com. And be sure to follow Comichron on Twitter and Facebook!

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June 2014 comics sales estimates: Market bounces back to a tie at halftime

by John Jackson Miller

http://bit.ly/CCBat32
The full estimates for June 2014 comics sales are now online, and as reported last weekend, at "halftime" we see a market that has rebounded from winter to bring this year's sales even with last year.

Retailers spent almost the exact same amount of money on comics and graphic novels in the period in the first halves of this year and last year, but this year they bought slightly more graphic novels and slightly fewer comic books. But the losses in comic books mainly came during the winter; they've perked up since. We were down 4% in overall sales in the first quarter and up 4% in the second. (So there's no "comics recession," at least in the two-negative-quarters definition of the term.)

http://bit.ly/AfterArchFurther, the "long tail" in comics has outperformed the Top 300. This is even more true of the long tail in graphic novels, though there is a caveat: the fact that Top 300 graphic novel revenue reads as off 8% for the year while Diamond says that the category overall is up 3% is partially explained by the fact that there were larger quantities of graphic novels dumped on the market at deep discount in the first half of 2013. We're seeing fewer graphic novels in the itemized charts, yes, but Diamond is seeing more wholesale revenue — which is what it bases its percentages on.

June itself was led by Batman #32 — and saw some upward movement by several titles, including Harley Quinn. The top graphic novel, as noted on Friday, was Afterlife with Archie Vol. 1, the first Archie graphic novel to top the book list with orders approaching 12,000 copies.

The comparison data:

TOP 300 COMICS UNIT SALES
June 2014: 6.46 million copies
Versus 1 year ago this month: -8%
Versus 5 years ago this month: -2%
Versus 10 years ago this month: -1%
Versus 15 years ago this month: -1%
Q2 2014: 20.09 million copies, -3% vs.Q2 2013
YEAR TO DATE: 38.39 million copies, -8% vs. 2013, +8% vs. 2009, +6% vs. 2004, +1 vs. 1999

ALL COMICS UNIT SALES
June 2014 versus one year ago this month: -4.51%
Q2 2014 vs. Q2 2013: -1.29%
YEAR TO DATE: -6.36%

TOP 300 COMICS DOLLAR SALES
June 2014: $23.75 million
Versus 1 year ago this month: -7%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +5%
Versus 10 years ago this month: +28%
Versus 15 years ago this month: +43%
Q2 2014: $76.77 million, +2% vs. Q2 2013
YEAR TO DATE: $144.77 million, -4% vs. 2013, +20% vs. 2009, +41% vs. 2004, +49% vs. 1999

ALL COMICS DOLLAR SALES
June 2014 versus one year ago this month: -2.93%
Q2 2014 vs. Q2 2013: +3.9%
YEAR TO DATE: -1.43%

TOP 300 TRADE PAPERBACK DOLLAR SALES
June 2014: $6.93 million
Versus 1 year ago this month: +2%
Versus 5 years ago this month: +15%
Versus 10 years ago this month, just the Top 100 vs. the Top 100: +25%
Versus 15 years ago this month, just the Top 25 vs. the Top 25: +27%
Q2 2014: $21.77 million, -7% vs. Q2 2013 
YEAR TO DATE: $42.4 million, -8% vs. 2013

ALL TRADE PAPERBACK  SALES
June 2014 versus one year ago this month: +8.09%
Q2 2014 vs. Q2 2013: +4.33%
YEAR TO DATE: +2.93%

TOP 300 COMICS + TOP 300 TRADE PAPERBACK DOLLAR SALES
June 2014: $30.68 million
Versus 1 year ago this month: -5%
Versus 5 years ago this month: -2%
Versus 10 years ago this month, counting just the Top 100 TPBs: +15%
Versus 15 years ago this month, counting just the Top 25 TPBs: +52%
Q2 2014 vs. Q2 2013: $98.54 million, unchanged vs. Q2 2013
YEAR TO DATE: $187.18 million, -5% vs. 2013

ALL COMICS AND TRADE PAPERBACK  SALES
June 2014 versus one year ago this month: +0.33%
Q2 2014 vs. Q2 2013: +4.04%
YEAR TO DATE: -0.08%

OVERALL DIAMOND SALES (including all comics, trades, and magazines) 
June 2014: approximately $41.68 million (subject to revision)
Versus 1 year ago this month: unchanged
Versus 5 years ago this month: +13%
Versus 10 years ago this month: +91%
Q2 2014 vs. Q2 2013: $132.94 million, up 4% vs. Q2 2013
YEAR TO DATE: $249.53 million, unchanged vs. 2013

RELEASES
New comic books released: 424
New graphic novels released: 246
New magazines released: 34
All new releases: 704

The average comic book in the Top 300 cost $3.72; the average comic book retailers ordered cost $3.67, a considerable drop. The median and most common price for comics offered was $3.99. Click to see comics prices across time.

Diamond only released the Top 300 this month, after several months of the Top 400. Various small publisher titles in the 300s and 400s were provided, and are shown on the listing page.

Look here tomorrow for the release of the long-awaited 2013 end-of-year data, including the direct market, outside channels, and digital, the product of our first-ever joint analysis with ICV2.

John Jackson Miller has tracked the comics industry for more than 20 years, including a decade editing the industry's retail trade magazine; he is the author of several guides to comics, as well as more than a hundred comic books for various franchises. He is the author of the New York Times bestseller Star Wars: Kenobi and the upcoming hardcover Star Wars: A New Dawn. Visit his fiction site at http://www.farawaypress.com. And be sure to follow Comichron on Twitter and Facebook!

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Comics sales recover from winter to finish first half of 2014 flat; Archie tops GN list for first time

Friday, July 11, 2014

by John Jackson Miller

http://bit.ly/AfterArch
Comic shops in North America spent the same amount of money on comic books and graphic novels in the first half of 2014 as they did during the first half of 2013, according to new data released by Diamond Comic Distributors. Retailers purchased almost $250 million worth of comics, graphic novels, and magazines in the period, a decrease of less than $200,000 at full retail. That's the equivalent of a single upper-tier comic book*; had one more shipped in the year, the Direct Market would be even or slightly ahead.

The flat dollar sales result represents a slowdown in unit sales terms for comic books, as 6.36% fewer copies shipped in the first half of the year; graphic novel unit sales were up 5.41%. Overall dollar orders for the second quarter were up more than 4%, making up for the losses during the first quarter. Spring sales volumes are always larger than winter volumes in comics, so even a mildly positive figure is enough to erase a drop as small as we saw in the first three months.

Dollar orders in the second half of 2013 were nearly 7% higher than in the first half of 2013, so to outperform last year, the same pace will need to be bettered going forward. The aggregate sales changes:

DOLLARS UNITS
JUNE 2014 VS. MAY 2014
Comics -3.19% -1.31%
Graphic Novels -3.36% 2.93%
Total Comics & GNs -3.25% -0.99%
JUNE 2014 VS. JUNE 2013
Comics -2.93% -4.51%
Graphic Novels 8.09% 10.26%
Total Comics & GNs 0.33% -3.46%
SECOND QUARTER 2014 VS. FIRST QUARTER 2014
Comics 14.13% 11.07%
Graphic Novels 13.59% 2.88%
Total Comics & GNs 13.96% 10.34%
SECOND QUARTER 2014 VS. SECOND QUARTER 2013
Comics 3.90% -1.29%
Graphic Novels 4.33% 1.25%
Total Comics & GNs 4.04% -1.09%
YEAR-TO-DATE 2014 VS. YEAR-TO-DATE 2013
Comics -1.43% -6.36%
Graphic Novels 2.93% 5.41%
Total Comics & GNs -0.08% -5.46%

June's orders overall were approximately $41.7 million, an increase of a third of one percent. Graphic novels were, again, the better performer, up 8% versus the nearly 3% loss in comics dollar orders. June 2014 and June 2013 were both four-shipping-week months.

The top-selling comic book was DC's Batman #32; DC had five slots in the Top 10, with Marvel taking four and Image taking one. The top-selling comics:

RANK DESCRIPTION PRICE VENDOR
1 Batman #32 $3.99 DC
2 Amazing Spider-Man #3 $3.99 Marvel
3 Original Sin #3 $3.99 Marvel
4 Harley Quinn #7 $2.99 DC
5 Superman #32 $3.99 DC
6 Original Sin #4 $3.99 Marvel
7 Amazing Spider-Man #1.2 $3.99 Marvel
8 Justice League #31 $3.99 DC
9 The Walking Dead #128 $2.99 Image
10 Detective Comics #32 $3.99 DC

Afterlife with Archie was the best-selling graphic novel in June 2014: it is the first time an Archie title has ever topped the graphic novel list. The book was offered with a Diamond-exclusive cover. The main Archie comic book title has topped the comics sales charts before, including during the year of 1969, when attention had been called to the line by the "Sugar, Sugar" song and The Archie Show animated TV series from Filmation, which ran the 1968-69 season on CBS.

The top-selling graphic novels and trade paperbacks:

RANK DESCRIPTION PRICE VENDOR
1 Afterlife With Archie Vol. 1: Escape From Riverdale $17.99 Archie
2 Night of the Living Deadpool $16.99 Marvel
3 Velvet Volume 1: Before The Living End $9.99 Image
4 Saga Volume 3 $14.99 Image
5 Saga Volume 1 $9.99 Image
6 Superior Spider-Man Vol. 6: Goblin Nation $19.99 Marvel
7 Batman & Robin Vol. 3: Death of the Family $14.99 DC
8 Injustice: Gods Among Us Volume 1 $14.99 DC
9 Injustice: Gods Among Us Volume 2 HC $19.99 DC
10 Saga Volume 2 $14.99 Image

The market shares found Marvel in the lead in both dollars and units and the top five publishers all above 5% in dollar shares:

PUBLISHER DOLLAR SHARE UNIT SHARE
Marvel 33.71% 35.68%
DC 29.88% 33.20%
Image 8.93% 10.51%
IDW 5.60% 4.45%
Dark Horse 5.57% 4.89%
Dynamite 2.62% 2.30%
Boom 2.52% 2.52%
Valiant 1.20% 1.27%
Avatar 1.10% 0.81%
Archie 0.93% 0.64%
Other 7.94% 3.74%

Finally, the new release volume was slightly larger than five-ship-week May's:

Comics shipped GNs shipped Magazines shipped Total shipped
DC 77 28 1 106
Marvel 78 24 0 102
Image 53 10 0 63
Dark Horse 36 23 0 59
IDW 43 16 0 59
Boom 28 7 0 35
Dynamite 23 9 0 32
Avatar 9 7 0 16
Zenescope 11 2 0 13
Random House 0 11 0 11
Other 66 109 34 209
TOTAL 424 246 35 705
The complete analysis with estimates will be along next week, and look soon for the figures on the industry's sales overall in 2013, including channels outside the Direct Market. ICV2 has just posted its estimates for digital sales in 2013, finding them at $90 million, an increase over 2012 but not by the colossal margins of earlier in the decade.

If you are at San Diego Comic-Con, be sure to drop by the Random House/Del Rey booth in the Lucasfilm Pavilion, where I will be signing all four days. I will also be speaking at the Star Wars panel at 2 in room 7AB on Friday.

John Jackson Miller has tracked the comics industry for more than 20 years, including a decade editing the industry's retail trade magazine; he is the author of several guides to comics, as well as more than a hundred comic books for various franchises. He is the author of the New York Times bestseller Star Wars: Kenobi and the upcoming hardcover Star Wars: A New Dawn. Visit his fiction site at http://www.farawaypress.com. And be sure to follow Comichron on Twitter and Facebook!

(* EDIT: A previous calculation had estimated the difference was only $20,000 at full retail.) 

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